About Us

Your resource to make physics teaching relevant to real world contexts.

Physics is a core subject that deals with many real life issues - reusable energy, climate change, and medical advancement. Yet it can be a challenge to link physics concepts to these important issues; most high school and university physics curriculum materials do not contain lessons and problem sets directly related to realistic problems. With this in mind, we set out to develop an extensive online database of materials which can support instructors who want to incorporate realworld physics examples and problems into their courses.

In this website you will find:

  • articles that clearly explain the physics concepts in a real world context
  • lecture notes in the form of power point presentations
  • data sheets with realistic numbers and information
  • problem sets and exam questions that would interest students (including solutions)
  • take-home experiments that can be done by students or by teachers as demonstrations in class

The materials on this site were developed by a team of physics instructors and students at the University of British Columbia and are in the process of being tested by high school teachers and graduate and undergraduate physics students. Ongoing surveying of instructors and student using this resource is being undertaken and feedback is appreciated at any time. Each topic is connected to curriculum content and learning outcomes within the high school science curriculum in the province of British Columbia (which in many cases follows the Pan-Canadian Science Curriculum). We provide solutions to all problem sets and multiple choice questions, which in some cases include providing excel spreadsheets to perform simulations and calculations. Take home experiments are tested and sample data sets provided. Therefore we hope that these materials can be easily incorporated into existing secondary and undergraduate physics courses.

We hope that through this website, we can encourage students' critical thinking and problem solving skills, and eventually help instructors to make sustainability central to their teaching.

This project is sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (University of British Columbia).


Current contributors to the project

Rachel Moll Rachel Moll

Instructor
Department of Curriculum & Pedagogy
University of British Columbia

Chris Waltham Chris Waltham

Faculty
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Theresa Liao Theresa Liao

Communications Coordinator
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Janelle van Dongen Janelle van Dongen

Ph.D student
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Shaun Dychko Shaun Dychko

Physics Teacher
Drupal Website Developer, Consultant, and Trainer

Andrzej Kotlicki Andrzej Kotlicki

Faculty
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Georg Rieger Georg Rieger

Faculty
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia


Past contributors

Brittany Tymos

Honours Biophysics
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Angela Ruthven

Outreach Assistant
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Chenchong (Charles) Zhu

Honours Physics and Astronomy
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Ph.D student
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

Claire Wheeler

Undergraduate student
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of British Columbia

Anoushka Rajan

Undergraduate student
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of British Columbia

Oren Rippel

Combined Honours Math and Physics
Undergraduate student
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of British Columbia

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

C21: Physics Teaching for the 21st Century
UBC Department of Physics & Astronomy
6224 Agricultural Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Tel 604.822.3675
Fax 604.822.5324
Email:

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